Loading...

From the Highlands to the Deep South of Madagascar

Madagascar 2015
Home / Stories / From the Highlands to the Deep South of Madagascar
Children at the St. Joseph's College in the small town of Ambohidratrimo, supported by the Ankizy Gasy - Children of Madagascar - Foundation, a polish NGO who help children from poor families to access to education and development.
Boys studying at the St. Joseph's College in the small town of Ambohidratrimo, supported by the Ankizy Gasy - Children of Madagascar - Foundation, a polish NGO who help children from poor families to access to education and development.
Girl at the St. Joseph's College in the small town of Ambohidratrimo, supported by theAnkizy Gasy - Children of Madagascar - Foundation, a polish NGO who help children from poor families to access to education and development.
Girl at the St. Joseph's College in the small town of Ambohidratrimo, supported by the Ankizy Gasy - Children of Madagascar - Foundation, a polish NGO who help children from poor families to access to education and development.
Lunch time at the St. Joseph's College in the small town of Ambohidratrimo, supported by the Ankizy Gasy - Children of Madagascar - Foundation, a polish NGO who help children from poor families to access to education and development.
Panoramic landscape of the Andringitra National Park
Panoramic landscape of the Andringitra National Park
Panoramic landscape of the Andringitra National Park
Workers in an aluminium smelter at Ambatolampy
Workers in an aluminium smelter at Ambatolampy
Workers in an aluminium smelter at Ambatolampy
Worker in an aluminium smelter at Ambatolampy
Typical green and red landscape of the highlands
Malagasy man showing the landscape
View from the Boby Peak in the Andringitra massif. With 2,658 meters of altitude, it is the second highest peak and the highest accessible summit of Madagascar.
Landscape of the Andringitra National Park
Landscape of the Andringitra National Park
Landscape of the Andringitra National Park
Malagasy girl in the Andringitra National Park
Rice fields
Waterfall and natural pool in the Isalo National Park
Waterfall and natural pool in the Isalo National Park
Workers at the Ilakaka mine, the largest sapphire mine in the world. Workers dig for several days and if the quantity and the quality of the sapphires is proven, they dig huge holes for months in search of the famous gems.
Worker at the Ilakaka mine waiting for the signal to bring up the sandbags; with some luck maybe there will find sapphire.
Worker at the Ilakaka mine bringing up sandbags.
Miner with his crowbar and his sandbags at the Ilakaka mine.
End of the day for this miner who pack away his rope at the Ilakaka mine.
Child diging like adults at the Ilakaka mine. In Madagascar, it is estimated that a quarter of children work from the early age. The effects of the 2009 coup, and the ensuing political and economic instability, continued to make children vulnerable to exploitation.
Young boy at the Ilakaka mine
Young girl at the Ilakaka mine
Young girl at the Ilakaka mine
Young fisherman on his traditional sailing boat in the Mozambique Channel
Traditional Vezo fishing pirogue. Vezo is the term for the semi-nomadic coastal people of southern Madagascar. The Vezo speak a dialect of the Malagasy language, which is a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian language group derived from the Barito languages, spoken in southern Borneo. They currently populate most of the littoral zone along Madagascar’s west coast between Toliara and Mahajanga.

From the Highlands to the Deep South of Madagascar

Where: Madagascar

When: 2015

A few miles from Africa the island of Madagascar floats modestly but forms by itself a continent on the side of its enormous neighbor with a vast and varied geography.

Beautiful melting pot, the red and green island harmonized in a fascinating singularity its African and Asian origins that characterized its multiples children’s faces. Although very diverse, they are all from there and not elswhere, attached by their traditions and customs to the land of their ancestors.

Rich by a diversity of its landscapes rarely seen on a such space, by the originality of an endemic fauna and flora, Madagascar is green from its forests and rice fields and red by its soil often exposed by time or humans. It is a land who combine flavors both in the structure of its landscape and its climates: savage and refined, aridity and fertility, oceanic and continental...

In this natural Eden, people from all walks of life have settled. Eighteen ethnic groups, originally coming from Far East, Middle East and Africa, share the island. They have merged different universes and created a unique singular culture. From the highlands terraced for the rice-fields to the turquoise lagoons of the deep south, the perfumes of Asia, Africa, Arabia, Oceania and Europe preserve their intensity; in the infinite variety of faces the world mixes its opulences.